Review: Nichome Tsukemen Gachi Shinjuku / 二丁目つけめんGACHI新宿

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On getting to film the chocolate ramen at the fabulous Mensho Tokyo at Korakuen, I discovered that there were quite a few restaurants in the Menya Shono group…. all with very intriguing menus.

Whilst Mensho Tokyo is known for its unusual lamb broth, Gachi is known for its chicken broth tsukemen with AN ENTIRE PIECE OF BREADED FRIED CHICKEN SLICED ON TOP. Continue reading

Review: Sakura Festival at Saka no Hana

Cherry blossom around Hikone castle

Cherry blossom around Hikone castle

Sakura season – otherwise known as cherry blossom season – spreads like a fever for a couple of weeks in April. For those who haven’t been to Japan during this period, you will be unprepared for the sheer decadence of the scenery and the sheer reverence with which it’s treated. You should probably see my blog post here.

In honour of this time of year, upmarket and rather swanky restaurant Sake no Hana held their own sakura festival with their very own sakura menu. The interior was decorated with some rather realistic and beautifully lit cherry blossom trees, and with delicate sakura painted along the counter at the bar.

Photo: Betty Chen

Isn’t this gorgeous? (Photo: Betty Chen)

Continue reading

Review: Rodells, Watford

Feast

Feast

They say the best things in life are worth some effort. If you want some excellent food, popping to the food court at the shopping centre ain’t going to make your taste buds’ dreams come true. So when I say that you all better bloody travel to Watford, you better bloody travel to Watford. In fact, I’m probably going to be shouting about this for the rest of the year. Zone 3 just became so much trendier. Watford is the place to go. Watford is the new East London. (Just with fewer moustaches and fixies.)

All of this enthusing is due to one place: Rodells.

Rodells... usually found without monkey-girl on lamp post

Rodells… usually found without monkey-girl on lamp post

Rodells

Rodells

Rodells is more than a restaurant; it’s an institution. It’s a food haven, a theatre, a family home, an evening hang-out and a democracy.

Rodells is the kind of place where you can spend five hours enjoying a meal. Which is exactly what we did.

Admittedly, I was a little sceptical when I received an email inviting me to Watford, but as I read on, my interest was piqued. Most restaurants have a speciality, even if it’s broad and regional in scope. ‘Modern European’ or ‘Pan-Asian’ might sound familiar. My most eclectic experience was probably when I visited a restaurant in Brasov that specialised in Mexican, but also served Hungarian and Romanian (and incidentally was fantastic).

Rodells takes eclecticism to a new level. The theme: world tapas. The reason: one man called Mario Tavares.

Cooking is like taking a photograph, Mario tells us. There is that one second where everything aligns and you have a beautiful shot, and a second later, the moment’s gone.

We’re sitting in a cosy upstairs room with Monty Python projected on the back wall. Rodells is a rather characterful property on the corner of some crossroads. Downstairs is a bar and some wooden counter seating, and larger restaurant tables are dotted around the two upstairs rooms.

Silent entertainment

Silent entertainment

Spending his early years in Macau, Mario moved to London just before his teens. However, the capital couldn’t contain him: he travelled the world as musician and film producer, playing for Motorhead, Paul Young and Keith Allen when he was a stand-up. During his adventures, he did what any self-respecting foodie would do and ate his way through a variety of cuisines. Yet Mario took his love of food one step further: he tracked down recipes.

‘I do a Thai green curry that’s not a Thai green curry,’ he tells us, perched at our table. ‘I learned the recipe in Kerala.’ It’s the kind of story that makes you blink twice. Whilst on the beach, he had been approached by a guy who sold three items: coconut oil, green curry and sunglasses. Brave or reckless – take your pick – Mario tried the curry and was blown away to the point where he pestered the man for the recipe.

Mario is clearly as creative as his background and the surrounds suggest. Food for him is ‘performance’; it’s an art form. Before he creates anything, he visualises it clearly in his mind. The theatrics extend to visitors’ dining experiences. Originally, each table had a blackboard built into them, each with a different menu. People had to strategically choose their menu depending on what they wanted to eat. For a past Valentine’s Day event, Mario hired an actress to sit drinking wine alone at a table. Whenever anyone went to the toilet, she would follow them and have an angry conversation on her phone at her good-for-nothing boyfriend who’d stood her up. This idea is so cheeky and hilarious that I grin every time I think of it.

As for the menu, we weren’t quite prepared for the scope of it: Korean, English, Portuguese, Louisianan, Caribbean, Cuban, Mexican, Thai, Malaysian, Indian, Spanish, Lebanese, Cantonese… the list goes on.

Arriving at Rodells, we had been greeted by a tall, good-looking young man, who thankfully insisted on talking us through the list of world cuisines.

‘I’m very into food,’ he said.

‘I’ve come to the right place,’ I thought.

Is our waiter a red hot model? Why yes. Am I posing shamelessly with him? Why yes?

Is our waiter a red hot model? Why yes. Am I posing shamelessly with him? Why yes.

Choosing what to order was agony. Today’s menu contained no less than 28 tapas dishes and three larger dishes. As an obsessive foodie, I got out my biro and began marking ‘definites’ and ‘potentials’, whilst grilling our waiter, Louis, on his preferences. The menu changes daily; Mario’s repertoire consists of 130 dishes that he has collected over the years. He has two assistant chefs, Louis informed us, but they can only cook four dishes to the right standard. We all try them and vote whether they’re good enough, he explained. What a lovely gastronomic democracy.

Pretty pretty food

Pretty pretty food

Flat iron steak

Flat iron steak

In the end, we ordered one of the ‘mains’ that Louis raved about – flat iron steak (£14.50). This was served beautifully rare with a delicate pepper cream sauce and some of the best frites that we’ve had in a while – frites that actually tastes of potatoes rather than crispy air. The steak was clearly fantastic quality but had been a little over-enthusiastically peppered, which detracted from the flavour of the beef itself. Fortunately, the cream sauce did much to alleviate any mouth-burning and was also delicious in its own right.

Mac 'n cheese sushi style

Mac ‘n cheese sushi style

Next up, we had ‘mac n cheese sushi style’ (£8). Before you wrinkle your nose with revulsion, let me state now that no raw fish was mixed with cheese or pasta! The macaroni cheese is cooked, then rolled in breadcrumbs into a cylindrical shape and sliced like sushi. Each delicate ‘sushi’ piece is then topped with a blob of sweet mustard sauce. Not being the biggest macaroni cheese fan in the world and highly wary of ordering pasta out in this country, we only chose this based on rave reviews from previous bloggers and being assured it was a ‘favourite’.

One mouthful and its popularity suddenly made sense. It was not the rubbery, chewy lump I had expected but was soft with perfect consistency. The cheese, in our opinion, was a little too strong for the dish, but we fully enjoyed the concept: it’s rare that a single dish becomes an experience in itself.

Nonya chicken curry

Nonya chicken curry

Next up, we tucked into another customer favourite – ‘nonya chicken curry’ (£6), described as the ‘sexiest curry in the world’. Nonya – or nyonya – is a Malaysian curry that’s prepared by women for women. Women feeding women? How could that not be sexy?! Seriously, and with all mildly crass jokes aside, this curry had a very sexy flavour. It was mild but rich, with faint hints of lemongrass. The chicken was a little dry, but the sauce was so amazing that I would happily eat this every day. I would drink it for breakfast.

Jambalaya with some mac n cheese sushi style to the left

Jambalaya with some mac n cheese sushi style to the left

Along came a jambalaya with prawns and chorizo (£6). The rice was cooked to perfection and pepped well with fresh oregano. Sadly, the chorizo was bland and so there was little smoky, garlicky, paprika flavour to permeate the rice. This was the only disappointment for me.

Portuguese stifado

Portuguese stifado

For the savoury dishes, we finished off with a Portuguese stifado (£6), which Mario sometimes also calls Greek stifado as the dish is also found there. This is a beef stew that’s wonderfully flavoured with cassia bark – like a warmer, less sweet and earthier variation of cinnamon. It’s a dish that is truly comforting and is popular across the ages.

The dessert menu was profoundly traumatic. There was far too many delicious things begging to be sampled. In the end, we ordered three desserts – purely for quality control purposes. Obviously. Ahem.

Marry me.

Marry me.

The brownies (£4.50) were pleasant yet unremarkable, but the lemon and ginger cheesecake (£4.50) was marriage material. The base was crisp and thin and the flavours were so expertly balanced that the lemon and ginger pulled off a perfect duet in my mouth, scoring a 10.

The best carrot cake in the world

The best carrot cake in the world

Concluding the munchathon, we delved into possibly one the tastiest carrot cakes in the world (£4.50). It was again harmonious with warm spice cut by beautiful sweet icing. This is the kind of cake that would audition other cakes to get into cake heaven.

If food is performance, then Mario has mastered his ingredients well – they sing and dance to the taste buds. Occasionally, they might miss the odd beat but the show remains a stunning success.

Rodells 4.5/5 – Brilliant tapas-style dishes from around the world in a homey setting. Bring your friends and dig in!

Food 4/5
Value 4/5
Service 5/5
Atmosphere 5/5

Web: www.itsrodells.com / @itsrodells
Where:
1a St Johns Road, Watford WD17 1PU
When:
Lunch 11 – 3pm; Dinner 5 – 11pm; Breakfast – delivery to some local post codes.

Review: Dozo, Old Compton Street, Soho

Hello sushi

Hello sushi

Originally published under my alias Queen Spatula on Tryum.com. Check out the site for more great foodie recommendations.

If, given the Christmas splurge, you’re hardly feeling flush for cash this January, it can be highly inconvenient to find yourself in central London and in desperate need of lunch. Such a situation can also ruin any new year resolutions you’ve made on healthy eating.

Let’s consider the following dilemma. You only have £6.90 to spend on lunch. You could get a burrito and screw the health repercussions. Or you could get a take-out salad and a juice. You may feel saintly but your stomach will likely be despondent within a half an hour, and the chances are that some pre-packed lettuce really didn’t excite your taste-buds.

Or how about option three: you could go to Dozo, get a delicious Japanese set lunch and feel absolutely amazing. This comes with the added bonus of getting to smugly gloat at any passer-bys with supermarket sandwiches.

Dozo

Dozo

A rather coy koi

A rather coy koi

Wedged next to Soho’s famous G-A-Y club, Dozo has a modest store front but a surprisingly authentic interior. It’s beautifully decorated – a large koi (carp) adorns the walls and low-set tables with a dropped floor replicate dining arrangements common in Japan. It’s a little dim inside but it’s an oasis  of calm in one of London’s busiest districts.

Of course, you can’t see its exquisite décor from the outside. What is really going to draw you in is the following sign:

Sign of hope!

Sign of hope!

A lunch set for £6.90? Really?

Some scepticism is perfectly understandable. That is until you’re presented with a beef teriyaki bento with perfectly cooked rice, two sets of pickles, a side salad and some miso soup. The teriyaki sauce is fantastic – full of great umami flavour and steering on the right side of sweet – and the salad is fresh with a great tangy dressing. What’s more, if you have penchant for drinking the sauce – and who would blame you when it tastes this good – the waiting staff will take pity on you and provide you with a spoon 😉

Beef teriyaki bento

Beef teriyaki bento

Beef teriyaki bento

Beef teriyaki bento

There’s a whole lot more than teriyaki dishes in the 12 – 3pm offer: crunch on some prawn and vegetable tempura, tuck into tonkatsu (deep-fried breaded pork cutlet), slurp through some ramen or dine on some sushi. Again – any of these for £6.90.

Hello sushi lunch set, we have a date!

Hello sushi lunch set, we have a date!

So my sound advice to you is… go and strand yourself in central London immediately and wait for lunchtime. Dozo will leave you with a happy and healthy body and wallet.

Website: http://www.dozosushi.co.uk/soho/
Where:
32 Old Compton Street, Soho, W1D 4TP
When:
12 – 3pm weekday lunch, also open for dinner. Details here.

Review: Chotto Matte, Soho – Nikkei Cuisine

Canchas - corn puffs

Canchas – corn puffs

Aburi salmon

Aburi salmon

I guess it’s a symptom of the age we live in that I’m suspicious of anything that doesn’t have a Wikipedia page on it. ‘Nikkei cuisine’ simply doesn’t exist. Some rudimentary Internet searches, although not the most fruitful, do give it come patchy context.

Originating from Peru, Nikkei cuisine is a hybrid of Japanese and Peruvian ingredients using Japanese preparation techniques and usually prepared by Japanese descendants. Apparently, this has been going on for the past 120 years and Lima is bustling with Nikkei restaurants, which is perhaps not surprising given Peru has the second highest Japanese population in South America.

Japanese food is forever trendy in the UK, but for the first time ever, a Peruvian restaurant won a Michelin star this September – Lima in central London. Some kind of Peruvian-Japanese hybrid, therefore, seems perfectly timed to cause an explosion in gastronomic gossip.

Swanky

Swanky

Oooh what's up there?

Oooh what’s up there?

Chotto Matte is certainly trying to make a statement. It is huge – three-floors of dimly-lit swankiness on Soho’s Frith Street. Its aesthetics range from the polished minimalism of a high-end hotel to the currently hip industrialism with some graffiti-inspired art. The result, sadly, is a little clinical and cold, and doesn’t inspire appetite; when it’s empty, it feels like kind of place where lonely people clutch their drinks in the hope that alcohol might magic company, but warmth and liveliness do seep through once the room fills up.

Our welcome also sent out some mixed messages. My dining partner and I were greeted by the front-of-house who wished us a pleasant meal whilst reminding us that we had our table for two hours only. How subtle. How relaxing.

We were then squeezed onto a tiny table and approached by a waiter who could only be described as a bounding puppy. He greeted us with such a wide, friendly grin and unadulterated enthusiasm that we couldn’t help but smile. That was, until he failed to leave us alone.

We’d barely sat for a minute before he approached us an encouraged us to order. Thirty seconds later he returned. We opened our menus and he was back again. We touched the drink menus and he pounced again. If he hadn’t had looked so eager to please, we might have suspected that we were being forced to order.

Tacos

Tacos

We ordered a cocktails – which were both light and refreshing – whilst attempting to peruse the menu. Feeling slightly anxious and pressured, we ordered a ‘while you wait’ – a taco selection for £6.95. Then we hastily settled on Nikkei Tasting Menu I (£35, now listed as £40) and Nikkei Tasting Menu II (£45). Little did we know, we would have no time to relax before the dishes rained down on us with such dizzying speed.

Our waiter approached us and handed us two taco selections. One is included in the tasting menu, he explained, and the other was the extra starter we’d ordered. Laughing, he put them down, until I quite bluntly said that one would suffice!

The taco selection was, fortunately, very tasty, and we worked our way through snow crab yuzu and miso vegetables. The only minor problem was the tune spicy miso – served raw- was quite fishy, which suggested it wasn’t the freshest and so we tactfully left it.

Torching the salmon!

Torching the salmon!

Next up, we got quite excited when a waitress approached the table with a blow torch and cooked the aburi salmón before our eyes. It was delicious as well as gimmicky.

Overall, the dishes varied from really interesting or just plain bizarre. The most successful dishes involved seafood. The seafood ceviche – prawn, scallop, seabass, sweet potato, Peruvian corn, coriander, chive oil, citrus sauce – was amazingly zingy and fresh, and the Bacalao negro aji miso (black cod, yellow chilli miso) was wonderfully subtle. The triumph had to be Corbina shiso salsa (seabass, shiso, chilli, onion, ponzu), which made me re-think my hatred of that potent, citrus sauce and indeed nearly had me licking the plate.

Black cod with yellow chilli miso

Black cod with yellow chilli miso

Seafood ceviche

Seafood ceviche

The star: seabass deliciousness

The star: seabass deliciousness

The meat, however, didn’t quite make it as credible ‘fusion’ cuisine. The lamb chop was tasty if minuscule and the gyoza (dumplings) were hardly complemented by aji amarillo (yellow chilli pepper). The greatest sin was was the lomo saltado maki rolls. Lomo saltado is a classic Peruvian dish of stir-fried beef with onions, tomatoes and potatoes, and it should never – I repeat, NEVER – be wrapped in seaweed.

Gyoza

Gyoza

Lamb with quinoa

Lamb with quinoa

Nevertheless, this dish did provide salvation on our evening. Our over-enthusiastic waiter was becoming so overbearing that we could barely enjoy our dishes. We had a confusingly large number of waiters throughout the evening, who would explain every platter they brought us. Our main waiter, however, seemed oblivious to the practice and painstakingly went over each dish in rather poor English. He regularly popped up and asked us how our dish was before we’d had a chance to sample it!

It got to the point where my co-diner and I were so on edge and stressed out that we were hardly conversing. Our waiter approached again and we both winced.

“How were the maki rolls?” he beamed.

My polite customer veneer cracked and I told him that, unfortunately, the lomo saltado ones just didn’t work at all. He nodded keenly until my words began to sink in, and slowly, very slowly, the smile began to slide from his face. He made a half-grimace and hastily retreated without another word.

I looked at my co-diner. “I think I just kicked a puppy.”

Lomo saltado maki rolls

Lomo saltado maki rolls – CRIMES to Peruvian and Japanese cuisine

After this incident, we were able to enjoy a much more peaceful meal and were given a free choice of dessert. I quickly polished off a salted caramel chocolate fondant with great relish.

Salted caramel chocolate fondant

Salted caramel chocolate fondant

We finished the meal in high spirits. The tasting menus were undeniably fun and the flavours definitely intrigue and amuse even if they don’t always seamlessly blend. However, the service and cramped tables detracted from the experience. At upwards of £50 a head for a meal and a drink, Chotto Matte needs to sharpen up. With these issues sorted, we’d happily give Nikkei cuisine a second chance.

Pretty crème brûlée

Pretty crème brûlée

Chotto Matte 3/5 – So trendy, quite tasty, but just a tad mixed up.

Food 3.5/5 – Some of it was really good. And some of it just was just… strange.
Value 2.5/5 – Priiiiiicey, but decent quality.
Service 2.5/5 – So polite and well-intentioned, but such a car crash!
Atmosphere 2.5/5 – Stressful, if popular.

Website: http://www.chotto-matte.com/
Where: 11–13 Frith Street, Soho, W1D 4RB
When: Mon – Sat 5pm – 1.30am; Sun 5pm – midnight

Sushi

Sushi

Prawn tempura maki roll

Prawn tempura maki roll

Pork belly, nashi pear, yellow tomato salsa, peruvian chilli

Pork belly, nashi pear, yellow tomato salsa, peruvian chilli

Prawn spring roll, shiitake, yuzu, shiso, ponzu salsa

Prawn spring roll, shiitake, yuzu, shiso, ponzu salsa

Eat Film: Spirited Away, Jonathan Ross and a Three-Course Japanese Meal

Me, Wossy and Loz

CHI—–ZU! Me, Wossy and Loz

The proper review is below. In the meantime, here’s my personal bit gushing about HOW EXCITED I was about my favourite movie, one of my fave TV personalities and a three-course Japanese meal all in the same evening.

We arrived late and so missed the cocktails and almost missed the hirata buns, which was bad news because I was starving. I desperately asked randomers where the food had come from and was told to find ladies in red.

The bell rang to tell us to go upstairs for the movie. I charged at a woman in red, nearly knocking over a poor sane guest – ironically the same who’d tipped me off. My greed persistence paid off and I made it to the auditorium armed with three of these tasty morsels. My friend Loz and I were feeling like BOSSES with our posh water and popcorn.

BOSS

BOSS

We then watched Spirited Away for the umpteenth time (go see it if you haven’t) and devoured some seriously gorgeous gastronomic goodies.

The absolute highlight, however, was encountering Wossy himself, not only because I love his show but because WE SPOKE JAPANESE TOGETHER.

We approached him and asked for a photo. Wherever I am, if I want to take a photo, I always shout “Shashin wo torimashou!”  (Let’s take a photo!) The one and only time I refrain from doing this, Jonathan Ross says to Loz and I, “Nice dresses, ladies. Shashin wo torimasenka?” (Shall we take (not) take a photo?)

Sheer and utter delight burst from me and I practically screamed at the poor man, “Nihongo wo hanashimasuka?” (Do you speak Japanese?)

Well, the answer is YES. Maybe not fluently, but I think he might trump my rather novice level.

One photo wasn’t enough for Wossy and he asked to pose for a second as below. Needless to say, I thanked him profusely in Japanese and he told me I was welcome.

Wossy trying very hard to be cute.

Wossy trying very hard to be cute.

Cue: Phoebe and Loz skipped down the street with happiness. Sadly not into the sunset. Because it was already dark. The end.

We're famous now

We’re famous now

—————————————————————————-

It’s a pretty exciting time if you love food right now. London Restaurant Festival sees a feast of gastronomic events across London with several restaurants offerings gloriously discounted menus. The great thing about food is that it’s easily combined with other forms of entertainment, and so last week BAFTA hosted the Eat Film event combining two art forms – film and food.

Eat Film

Eat Film

BAFTA is at the grandiose location of 195 Picadilly and sees a sweeping staircase lead guests to a large reception-cum-dining room on the first floor. Guests, many of whom had gone for red carpet glam, were sipping cocktails whilst waitresses in dazzling red uniforms handed out hirata buns. Originally gua bao for Taiwan, these delicious, soft steamed buns filled with belly pork, hoi sin and sriracha, have become a major food trend in the West and have been popularised as Japanese under the term ‘hirata buns’ after the New York chef who introduced them. Music from a Japanese koto (long stringed instrument) drifted through the chatter. In the midst of the crowd was Jonathan Ross.

Sadly, Jonathan Ross was not there by accident – for that might make an amazing story – but rather he was responsible for the whole evening. He had been invited to host the Eat Film event and had determined the theme of the evening: Japan. Because whilst he may be renowned as a charismatic, if sometimes controversial, interviewer and film geek, his interests and expertise also extend to the Far East: he is huge Japanophile and he had selected tonight’s movie, Spirited Away.

Popcorn - with the occasional hint of wasabi

Popcorn – with the occasional hint of wasabi

We shuffled upstairs into the auditorium. Nestled into our seats with Voss mineral water that looked a tiny bit too swanky to just water, we munched on sweet and wasabi-flavoured popcorn – surprisingly successful – whilst Jonathan Ross took to the stage to say a few words. Not only does Wossy love Spirited Away – it’s the film his family put on if one of them is feeling unwell – but he got to meet Hayao Miyazaki, its legendary director from Studio Ghibli.  Ross asked him what made truly great animation and Miyazaki had replied the landscapes.This is certainly what strikes the viewer about Spirited Away or indeed any Studio Ghibli offering as they create some of the most startlingly beautiful animated movies that will ever grace your eyes.

Jonathan Ross

Jonathan Ross telling us about his pal, Miyazaki

Jonathan Ross

Jonathan Ross telling us about his pal, Miyazaki

Spirited Away tells the story of a sullen and annoying young girl called Chihiro, who discovers an abandoned theme park with her parents. Things start to get a little creepy when she bumps into a mysterious young boy, and then the plot fully embraces the surreal as her parents turn into pigs and she finds herself working for a witch, who runs a bathhouse for spirits. It is takes weird to the level that perforates the imaginations of the majority of us, but this is what makes it so absolutely enthralling; so richly imagined is the world that you don’t question it, but accept talking frogs and a one-way train through water, over ethereal watercolour backdrops. 

Spirited Away - my all-time fave movie :)

Spirited Away – my all-time fave movie 🙂

After our two hours of heart-warming escapism, we made our way for the three-course dinner. 195 Picadilly’s Head Chef Anton Manganaro had prepared an intricate plate of Japanese-inspired starters beautifully laid before us atop a large green, leaf. We sampled salmon temari – thinly sliced raw salmon on a rice ball- with a delicate soy dip and wasabi. Next to this was chakan-style sweet potato and the classic, and frankly addictive, miso aubergine. There was also pork belly cooked in dashi – the sweet, smoky fish stock prominent throughout all Japanese cuisine –  and chicken so tender and delicately flavoured that it took us all by surprise.

Starters

Starters

Salmon temari

Salmon temari

This chicken was so good!

This chicken was so good!

Needless to say, there was much excitement about the main, and needless to say, we were not disappointed. We were served a very sweet miso-glazed hake that was beautifully counterbalanced with the earthiness from azuki bean rice.

Sweet miso hake with azuki bean rice

Sweet miso hake with azuki bean rice

Dessert, however, was a departure from Japanese produce and a tribute to Miyazaki. When Jonathan Ross visited the director at his house, Miyazaki served up an English afternoon tea with one of his favourite sweets – ginger cake. So a moist ginger cake with chestnut ice-cream and yoghurt foam graced our plates, albeit briefly because it was so good it was hastily devoured.

Ginger cake

Ginger cake

Chestnut ice-cream

Chestnut ice-cream

All too soon the evening was drawing to a close. But there was one last thing we had yet to do. Jump Jonathan Ross for a photo of course! But he was very friendly and even gave us a few words of Japanese.

Domo arigatou Wossy. Domo arigatou Eat Film. May the event return to the next London Restaurant Festival for it was one of the most unusual and tastiest nights out we’ve had.